Fredrick Litchfield
Fredrick Litchfield
Fredrick Litchfield

To display in FULL SCREEN hover the cursor over the image above ‚Äčand click the top left zoom button


Photo of Fredrick Litchfield who was one of the founding members of the original Hampstead Garden Suburb Trust, assembled by Henrietta Barnett to help by the land for what became the suburb. 

Photograph, HGSAT8
Fredrick Litchfield
Related person/organisation
[BLANK]
The Hampstead Garden Suburb Archives Trust is a registered charity, known as Suburb Archives. It is responsible for ensuring that the archives of the suburb are properly cared for and are accessible to all.
Related Collections
[BLANK]
Photos and information slides documenting the group of influential men Henrietta Barnett brought together to form the Trust and buy the land for the Suburb.

[BLANK]
Photos and information slides documenting the group of influential men Henrietta Barnett brought together to form the Trust and buy the land for the Suburb.
Related objects
Sir John Brunner was one of the co-founders of the Hampstead Garden Suburb Trust and a prominent public figure, serving as an MP in Cheshire as well as building numerous affordable homes for the working class families in the area. 

The Marquis of Crewe was a prominent figure in the formation of the Suburb and was a active member of the Liberal Party in the late 19th and early 20th Century, being a part of the 1906-14 Liberal Party government which laid down the foundations for the modern welfare state. 
 

Walter Hazell was one of the six men that Henrietta Barnett recruited to form the original Hampstead Garden Suburb Trust Company to buy the land for the Suburb. This is as well as being a succesful businessman in the printing industry, one of the photographs on display being a plaque commemorated to him. 

[BLANK]
Bishop Winnington-Ingram of London was one of the six influential men recruited by Henrietta Barnett to buy the land for the Suburb, and such was the Bishop's influence in the formation of the area that both Ingram Ave and Winnington Road are named after him. He was also known to have large parts of what is now the Suburb as the Bishop of London's private hunting forest.